News
Oct 17, 2017

Workshop on cardiac imaging


 

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Center Deputy Director of Scientific Computing, Samuel Wall from Simula Research Laboratory talked about image based patient specific mechanical modeling of the heart during the workshop on cardiac imaging of the right ventricle on Wednesday 11th of October.

These models can be applied to cardiac mechanics through accurate capture of image based metrics. The utility of computational models is in their ability to probe mechanical features that are difficult or impossible to directly measure, like mechanical stress and contractile forces, giving patient specific models a potential diagnostic value across a variety of disease states.

Category: General
Posted by: Piritta


Center Deputy Director of Scientific Computing, Samuel Wall from Simula Research Laboratory talked about image based patient specific mechanical modeling of the heart during the workshop on cardiac imaging of the right ventricle on Wednesday 11th of October. These models can be applied to cardiac mechanics through accurate capture of image based metrics. Wall presented case studies on the use of mechanical modeling in LV heart failure and RV analysis in pulmonary hypertension. The utility of computational models is in their ability to probe mechanical features that are difficult or impossible to directly measure, like mechanical stress and contractile forces, giving patient specific models a potential diagnostic value across a variety of disease states.

Working together with clinicians, Simula provides advanced modeling techniques in the fields of cardiac electrophysiology, electro-mechanics, and geometric modeling to enable enriched patient specific diagnostics and treatment planning, focusing on the two major challenges in modern cardiology: sudden cardiac death and death from heart failure. SLR is one of the collaborating partners at CCI.


Center PhD fellow Øyvind Lie talked about the advantages and possibilities of 3D echocardiography compared to 2D analysis in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC). AC is an inheritable disease associated with risk of sudden cardiac death as first symptom, manifesting with dysfunction in both the right ventricle (RV) and left ventricle. Conventional 2D analysis has some important structural limitations, and CMR (Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is a necessary addition. An expert consensus document, with center director Thor Edvardsen and center director of cardiology research Kristina Haugaa among the authors, published earlier this year highlights advantages of multimodality imaging and the prospects of 3D-derived indices.

Subtle RV contraction abnormalities, even when assessed by the limited 2D parameters, are markers of life-threatening arrhythmic events. 3D is rapid, accurate and reproducible, and triplane acquisitions may provide further insight to RV mechanics.  Methods derived from 3D echocardiography give new insight into the mechanic assessment of RV and may have even greater yield in diagnosis and risk stratification, and might have application to other RV manifesting diseases.


Center member at GE Vingmed Ultrasound Jørn Bersvendsen gave us a look into the future of RV echocardiography, showcasing upcoming implementations into the software used in cardiac ultrasound.

 

The workshop was organized by Einar Hopp (OUH), Oliver Geier (OUH) and Emil Espe (UiO/OUH), with following talks;

 

Image Based Patient Specific Mechanical Modelling of the Heart  - Samuel Wall, Simula

Echocardiography of right ventricle cardiomyopathies: current possibilities and challenges  - Øyvind H. Lie, OUH

RV echocardiography: what does the future look like?  -  Jørn Bersvendsen, GE Healthcare

Assessment of right ventricular performance with cardiac MRI  - Jostein Gleditsch,  Helse Østfold

MRI of the right ventricle in congenital heart defects  -  Charlotte De Lange,  OUH

3D-Printing of Heart Analogues  - Robin Bugge, OUH

Heart SFI